Human Trafficking 2020

Helping Create a Culture Free of Modern Day Slavery

Trafficking in America Task Force is a 501(c)3 nonprofit, Tax ID: 32-0495587. Your contribution is fully tax-deductible in the USA.

RECENT HUMAN TRAFFICKING STATISTICS

 

According to the International Labor Organization (ILO)

 

  • Forced labor in the private economy generates US$ 150 billion in illegal profits per year, about three times more than previously estimated, according to a new report from the International Labor Organization (ILO).
  • 2/3 of the estimated total of US$ 150 billion, or US$ 99 billion, came from commercial sexual exploitation, while another US$ 51 billion resulted from forced economic exploitation, including domestic work, agriculture and other economic activities.
  • The breakdown of profits generated by forced economic exploitation is as follows:
    – US$ 34 billion in construction, manufacturing, mining and utilities
    – US$ 9 billion in agriculture, including forestry and fishing
    – US$ 8 billion saved by private households by not paying or underpaying domestic workers held in forced labor.
  • Profits per victim are highest in forced sexual exploitation, which can be explained by the demand for such services and the prices that clients are willing to pay, and by the low capital investments and low operating costs associated with this activity. With a global average profit of US$21,800 per year per victim, this sector is six times more profitable than all other forms of forced labor, and five times more profitable than forced labor exploitation outside domestic work.
  • It is estimated that the profits made with the world’s 10.7 million victims of non-domestic forced labor exploitation reach US$43.4 billion per year, with an average annual profit of US$4,000 per victim. This profit is estimated to be the result of the exploitation of victims in agriculture on the one hand, and industrial sectors (construction, manufacturing mining and utilities) on the other.
  • It is estimated that nearly US$8 billion are literally stolen annually from the 3.4 million domestic workers in forced labor worldwide. This estimate is based on data collected by the ILO for the 2012 Global Estimate, which shows that domestic workers in forced labor are effectively deprived, on average, of 60 per cent of their due wages.
  • The total annual profits made from forced sexual exploitation are estimated at US$99 billion worldwide. The profits are highest in Asia due to the large number of victims, but annual profits per victim are highest in Developed Economies (US$80,000) and the Middle East (US$55,000), due to the high average price of sexual encounters.
  • Profits per victim are highest in forced sexual exploitation, which can be explained by the demand for such services and the prices that clients are willing to pay, and by the low capital investments and low operating costs associated with this activity. With a global average profit of US$21,800 per year per victim, this sector is six times more profitable than all other forms of forced labor, and five times more profitable than forced labor exploitation outside domestic work.
  • It is estimated that the profits made with the world’s 10.7 million victims of non-domestic forced labor exploitation reach US$43.4 billion per year, with an average annual profit of US$4,000 per victim. This profit is estimated to be the result of the exploitation of victims in agriculture on the one hand, and industrial sectors (construction, manufacturing mining and utilities) on the other.
  • It is estimated that nearly US$8 billion are literally stolen annually from the 3.4 million domestic workers in forced labor worldwide. This estimate is based on data collected by the ILO for the 2012 Global Estimate, which shows that domestic workers in forced labor are effectively deprived, on average, of 60 per cent of their due wages.
  • The total annual profits made from forced sexual exploitation are estimated at US$99 billion worldwide. The profits are highest in Asia due to the large number of victims, but annual profits per victim are highest in Developed Economies (US$80,000) and the Middle East (US$55,000), due to the high average price of sexual encounters.

 

 

More Statistics According to the National Institute of Justice

 

  • NIJ-supported research reveals that labor and sex trafficking data appearing in the FBI’s national Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program may significantly understate the extent of human trafficking crimes in the United States.
  • Trafficking Incidence Far Exceeds Trafficking Reports: In two of the three study sites jurisdictions with populations of 2.3 million and 600,000, respectively — researchers concluded that human trafficking incidents identified in law enforcement and social service agency records likely represented only a fraction of the actual incidence. The study found that the official trafficking numbers in one jurisdiction represented as little as 14% and at most 18% of the potential total trafficking victims. Looking at law enforcement’s human trafficking records alone, under reporting in those two jurisdictions was even more acute, with no more than 6% of potential human trafficking victims captured in police records in both jurisdictions, the research report noted.
  • In 2018, the US Department of Justice funded 45 victim service providers with $31 million, almost doubling its budget from 2017, when it provided $16 million to 18 organizations.
  • Estimates suggest that, internationally, only about .04% survivors of human trafficking cases are identified, meaning that the vast majority of cases of human trafficking go undetected.
  • In 2018, The National Human Trafficking Hotline received more calls from California than any other state in the US, followed by Texas and Florida, respectively.
  • According to the 2018 US National Human Trafficking Hotline Statistics, the hotline has handled 51,919 cases since 2007.
  • In 2018, there were 10,949 human trafficking cases reported to the National Hotline, 23,078 survivors identified, 5,859 potential traffickers, and 1,905 suspicious businesses.

 

 

The top 3 types of trafficking cases from 2018:

Sex Trafficking
– Escort Services (1,535)
– Residential Based (635)
– Pornography (537)

Labor Trafficking
– Domestic work (214)
– Agriculture & Animal Husbandry (157)
– Traveling Sales Crew (138)

Sex and Labor Trafficking
– Illicit Massage, Health, & Beauty (1,011)
– Bars, Strip Clubs, & Cantinas (214)

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Trafficking in America Task Force is a 501(c)3 nonprofit, Tax ID: 32-0495587. Your contribution is fully tax-deductible in the USA.

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